Louis Agassiz Fuertes & the fruits of a bloody jaunt to Abyssinia.

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The Crested Hornbill. Bycanistes cristatus (Ruppell).
“The loud voice, noisy flight, and large size of these hornbills make them very conspicuous. They are forest birds and feed mainly on fruit. They sometimes gather in groups to roost together.”

 

The Gelada Baboon. Theropithecus gelada (Ruppell).
“Although most African baboons inhabit the warmer parts of the country, this one prefers high mountains where the climate is relatively cool. It frequents rocky peaks and walls of steep canyons, which it scales with incredible ease and speed.”

 

The Gelada Baboon. Theropithecus gelada (Ruppell).
“The face of the gelada baboon does not have the dog-like shape of other baboons. The nostrils are laternal instead of terminal, as in some of the smaller monkeys. There is no bright color in the face, but on the chest are naked areas of red.”

 

Thick Billed Raven. Corvultur crassirostris (Ruppell).
“This strikingly marked bird belongs to the crow family but is vulturine in habits and commonly feed on carrion in company with the vultures and kites. It frequents villages and camps where it acts as a scavenger.”

 

 

Abyssinian Lanner. Falco Biarmicus Abyssinicus (Neumann).
“The lanner is a true falcon, swift, active and powerful in flight. It is a relative of the well known peregrine falcon and has been a favourite among the species used in falconry.”

 

Black-Shouldered Kite. Elanus Caeruleus (Desfontaines).
“This handsome kite feeds on insects, small birds, and reptiles. When resting, its perch is usually a bush or a small tree. Its flight is light and bouyant.”

 

African Harrier Hawk. Gymnogenys typicus (Smith).
“A hunter of small prey such as frogs, lizards, snakes and some small birds. It frequents grasslands and burned-over areas, and usually flies only moderate distances, resting at frequent intervals.”
Egyptian Vulture. Neophron occipitalis (Burchell).
“This vulture commonly feeds apart from other species. It is widely distributed in Africa except in the forested regions.”

 

Abyssinian Wolf. Canis simensis. (Ruppell).
“This is a long-legged and slender snouted canine found only in the mountains of Abyssinia. Although fox-like in colour, it is wolf-like in habits, at least to the extent of going in small packs. It subsists mainly on small rodents.

 

Secretary Bird. Sagittarius Serpentarius (Miller).
“An inhabitant of the open plains. It feeds on snakes, lizards, and other small animals which it kills by repeated blows with its feet. It is nearly related to vultures and hawks.”

 

White-Necked Vulture. Pseudogyps Africanus (Salvadori).
“This vulture is most common in forest regions, though it is often found on the African plains in company with other carrion-feeders.”

 

African Tawny Eagle. Aquila Rapax Raptor (Brehm).
“A powerful species of predatory habits, which feeds on small antelopes, hares, bustards and other such game. It is allied to the well known golden eagle of northern countries. Its nest is a large structure and enlarged from year to year.”

 

White Headed Vulture. Trigonoceps Occipitalis (Burchell).
“This vulture commonly feeds apert from other species. It is widely distributed in Africa except in the heavily forested regions.”

 

Bateleur Eagle. Terathopius ecaudatus (Daudin).
“This handsome eagle kills much of its own prey but sometimes is found devouring carrion in company with the vultures. Its souring flight is unusually swift and graceful. The extremely short tail gives these birds in flight a peculiar abreviated” appearance that is very characteristic. They are rarely seen except on the wing, where they are very expert, swift, and graceful.”

 

African Sea Eagle (immature). Cuncuma vocifer (Daudin).
“This species has been accused of killing small lambs on occasion, but its ordinary food consists of much smaller and more easily procured animals, such as fish, crabs, and reptiles to which is added a variable amount of carrion.”

 

African Sea Eagle. Cuncuma vocifer (Daudin).
“Common on the coast and found in the vicinity of rivers and lakes. It is usually seen perched in conspicous plaves near the water or flapping slowly over the surface, ready to pounce on an unlucky fish that rises too close to the top.”

 

Bearded Vulture. Gypaetus barbatus meridionalis (Keys. and Blas.)
“A relative of the lammergeyer of the Alps. It commonly feeds on carrion, though it is known, at times, to kill its prey. Its flight is stately and powerful.”

December 2018.

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